Andrew Jackson’s history as slave owner leads Alameda to change park name

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ALAMEDA, Calif. (KRON) — The city of Alameda’s first public park now has no name.​

This after the city council voted to de-name what until last night had been known as Jackson Park.​

The park’s former namesake was former President Andrew Jackson, but his history as a slave owner led to this change.

Jackson Park in Alameda is now just a park — nameless until further notice.​

“I think it’s completely appropriate,” Tim Damroth said.

“I don’t think we should have a park named after someone who has done such awful things,” William Brooke said.

On Tuesday night, the city council voted unanimously to de-name the greenbelt.​

The decision was spurred by a recommendation from the recreation and parks commission to remove the name.​

“I think it’s appropriate if that’s what the collective will of the local population is,” John Fay said.

In the early 1900s — the city’s first public park was renamed from Alameda Park to Jackson Park in honor of Andrew Jackson, the seventh president of the United States.​

But, over the years, the city has considered changing the park’s name due to Jackson’s history as a slave owner.​

In light of the civil unrest this year following several high profile incidents of racial injustices nationwide, the city is making the change now.​

“Aside from just raising awareness about the name and the connotations, it can emphasis the fact that Alameda is a very anti-racist place,” Emily Price said. “Not just not racist, but actively going against racist sentiments.”​

​Memorials of the former president have either been defaced or forcibly removed in other parts of the country.​

There are also plans to replace Jackson from the 20-dollar bill with an image of abolitionist Harriet Tubman.​

But those plans have been delayed.​

As for the park, the city says it will take weeks to remove the signage.​

A group of community members will eventually choose the new name.​

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