BART employee saves man from committing suicide on tracks

Bay Area

Curtis Zedd, Senior Operations Fore-worker Staffing Services (BART), at San Francisco International Airport BART Station. He helped talk a man from taking his life at the Millbrae Station. (Photo/BART)

MILLBRAE, Calif. (KRON) – A BART employee helped save a man who was having a mental health crisis at the Millbrae Station in June.

Curtis Zedd Jr. is a BART senior operations foreworker, which means he supervises train operators and station agents.

But on June 23, he did so much more than that.

Zedd arrived at the Millbrae Station for his shift when he saw two agents talking to a man standing on the tracks. He was standing between tracks that the trains run on and an electrified rail, that officials say can be deadly if touched.

Zedd contacted the Operations Control Center to shut off the power to the rail, and then went to the platform to talk to the man.

Curtis Zedd, Senior Operations Fore-worker Staffing Services (BART), at San Francisco International Airport BART Station. He helped talk a man from taking his life at the Millbrae Station. (Photo/BART)

The man appeared to be in his late 50s and was a homeless veteran.

“The first thing I said to him was, ‘Is everything OK?’ “ Zedd recalled. “And he said, ‘No, I’m just tired. I’m tired of everything,’ And I asked him to tell me about what was going on with him. He said he’d already told it, that he’d told his whole story. And I said, ‘Well, you haven’t told it to me. Tell me what’s going on.’“

“I told him that tomorrow would be another day. That he was able to wake up today, and now he would be able to wake up tomorrow and there would be another chance,” Zedd continued.

Zedd has faced traumatic situations throughout his career, including witnessing a woman throw herself in front of a train at the Montgomery Station just months after training, in addition to persuading a person off the edge of a platform.

BART officials say Zedd ‘doesn’t want to be called a hero’ — He says he was just following his instincts.

Police arrived and the man was given a mental health assessment.

“When we see people who are in trouble, who need help, we try to help them. We sympathize with them,” he said.

If you are struggling emotionally or thinking of suicide, call 1-800-273-8255.

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