SAN FRANCISCO, Calif. (KRON) – The National Park Service’s oldest park ranger is retiring at the age of 100.

Ranger Betty Reid Soskin, who celebrated her 100th birthday in Sept. 2021, retired on Thursday after a decade and a half. Soskin has shared her experiences and efforts of diverse women who working on the World War II Home Front, according to NPS.

On her last day, she visited coworkers at Rosie the Riveter/WWII Home Front National Historical Park and gave an interpretive program to the community.

“To be a part of helping to mark the place where that dramatic trajectory of my own life, combined with others of my generation, will influence the future by the footprints we’ve left behind has been incredible,” said Betty Reid Soskin.

Soskin has been a permanent NPS employee since 2011 and has led public programs and shared personal memories at the park visitor center.

The NPS shared that Soskin used to scope meetings in Richmond and the NPS to develop a plan for Rosie the Riveter/WWII Home Front National Historical Park. She worked to uncover African America stories with a grant from PG&E.

“Betty has made a profound impact on the National Park Service and the way we carry out our mission,” said NPS Director Chuck Sams. “I am grateful for her lifelong dedication to sharing her story and wish her all the best in retirement. Her efforts remind us that we must seek out and give space for all perspectives so that we can tell a more full and inclusive history of our nation. Congratulations, Betty!”

On Saturday, April 16, Soskin’s retirement will be celebrated in Richmond at the Rosie the Riveter/World War II Home Front National Historical Park.

Secretary Deb Haaland posted to Twitter saying:

“Park Ranger Betty Reid Soskin has been a trailblazer for women and the Park Service. After countless tours at @RosieRiveterNPS and millions of smiles, today she is retiring. On behalf of @Interior, thank you, Betty, for your service. You will be missed.”