San Jose airport gets nearly $55.5M in federal funding for COVID-19 recovery

Bay Area

An advertisement for San Jose International Airport suggests to users to “like” the airport’s Facebook page, at the airport in San Jose California, May 15, 2012. Studies have found that users spend far more time with the mobile version of Facebook’s network than they do on the browser version, but raising advertising revenues from the mobile platform has proven more difficult than for the desktop version. Facebook, the world’s most popular internet social network, expects to raise USD 12.1 billion in what will be Silicon Valley’s largest-ever initial public offering (IPO) later this week. AFP PHOTO / ROBYN BECK (Photo credit should read ROBYN BECK/AFP/GettyImages)

SAN JOSE, Calif. (BCN) — After facing one of the highest drops in passenger traffic in the country, the Norman Y. Mineta San Jose International Airport is getting a big break — nearly $55.5 million from the federal government to help it recover from COVID-19.

The grant funding, which comes from the American Rescue Plan, was announced by Silicon Valley Congresswoman Zoe Lofgren.

“For more than a year, the pandemic has placed a significant strain on our nation’s airports and aviation workers,” Lofgren said. “I supported the American Rescue Plan to provide much-needed aid to families, workers, and businesses and bring us to closer to a safe return to normalcy. These funds will help ensure San Jose’s primary airport can maintain its operations and continue serving the South Bay.”

The American Rescue Plan is a $1.9 trillion economic stimulus bill passed by Congress to help the nation recover from the pandemic. President Joe Biden signed it into law in March.

The Airport Rescue Grants awarded to the Mineta San Jose International Airport are part of $8 billion provided to airports and airport concessions around the nation to prevent and respond to COVID-19. Keonnis Taylor, a spokesperson for the airport, said the money will help pay off the airport’s debt, operating costs and concession programs.

“We are moving steadily toward recovery,” Taylor told San Jose Spotlight. “These funds will be allocated toward (these services and programs) that were impacted by COVID-19.”

According to a San Jose Spotlight analysis in May, the city-owned airport saw a 53 percent drop in passengers in early April of this year compared to before the pandemic. Both San Jose and San Francisco are in the top five airports with the biggest reduction in passengers.

San Jose’s drop in passengers is almost twice the national average of approximately 28 percent.

Taylor said specific distributions have not yet been decided by airport leadership.

Money from the grant can be used for operations, personnel, cleaning, debt services and any programs that help prevent the spread of COVID-19 at airports.

The Bureau of Transportation Statistics show domestic passenger traffic across the U.S. was down 59 percent in 2020 compared to before the pandemic.

The $55.5 million awarded to the downtown airport is the latest in a wave of funding to support its operations.

In March, Lofgren announced $1.6 million for the airport’s economic recovery from the Coronavirus Response and Relief Supplemental Appropriation Act. The airport in April 2020 received more than $65.6 million in funding from the CARES Act.

Taylor said airport officials and workers appreciate the support they’ve received from Lofgren.

“(We) are grateful for the work and representation of our elected officials advocating for our airport and region,” Taylor said.

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