ShakeOut drills happening across California

California

SAN FRANCISCO (KRON) – Millions across California on Thursday will participate in the 2019 Great ShakeOut Earthquake Drills.

During this drill, participants will practice “Drop, Cover and Hold On,” which is the recommended safety action to take during an earthquake, according to the USGS.

Graphic: USGS

The ShakeOut was founded by the USGS in California in 2008.

Most ShakeOut drills will be held at 10:17 a.m. local time, although drills can be held anytime on other days if necessary.

If you’re indoors, practice DCH – drop where you are onto your hands and knees, then crawl for cover under a nearby sturdy desk or table and hold on to it securely.

If you’re not near a desk or table, crawl against an interior wall, then protect your head and neck with your arms.

Avoid exterior walls, windows, hanging objects, mirrors, tall furniture large appliances and kitchen cabinets filled with heavy objects or glass.

If you happen to be outdoors, move to a clear and open area if you can.

Avoid power lines, trees, signs, buildings, vehicles and items that could potentially fall on you.

If you’re driving, pull over and set the parking brake; do not shelter under bridges, overpasses, power lines or traffic signs. Remain inside your car until the shaking has stopped.

According to the USGS, the original ShakeOut was based on an analysis of a major Southern California earthquake known as “the ShakeOut Scenario,” which demonstrated how science can be applied to reduce risks related to natural hazards.

The third Thursday of October each year is now International ShakeOut Day.

The drill marks the 30th anniversary of the Loma Prieta earthquake in the Bay Area.

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