SAN FRANCISCO, Calif. (KRON) — Even avid gamers are willing to admit, some video games stir up feelings of intense, out-of-control anger.

A new survey by Time2play.com asked more than 1,000 gamers, which video games make you feel the most rage? The average age of those surveyed was 28 years old and they played an average of 15 hours per week.

Time2play.com also asked gamers, what was it about the game that caused their emotions to boil over? The top five reasons were: Repeatedly losing the same level, other players using hacks or cheats, game bugs, griefers, and campers.

“There are few things more enraging for gamers than a seemingly insurmountable level or an online foe who always has your number. Add in some game bugs along with a camper or two, and you’ve got the perfect recipe for an angry gamer,” Ben Treanor of Time2play.com wrote.

gaming anger
(Data courtesy time2play.com)

A “camper” is an opponent who hides inside a building or behind a tree for most of the game, and uses sniper tactics when other players run by.

A “griefer” is a type of bully in Minecraft. A griefer will damage another player’s buildings, sets traps, and steal, just to be mean.

Call of Duty ranked No. 1 as the most rage-inducing game, followed by Mario Kart at No. 2, and Minecraft at No. 3. League of Legends, Super Smash Bros., and Grand Theft Auto rounded out the top six seethers.

(Data courtesy Time2play.com)

Devices also made a difference in rage levels. Twenty-one percent of Xbox users felt gaming-related anger once a day, while PC gamers were a little more mellow, with 14 percent experiencing daily anger.

Nearly 42 percent of gamers said they deal with “extreme anger” once a week. On the flip side, only 4.6% of respondents said they never experience extreme anger from gaming. 

Does a player’s passion spill from a screen into the real world? “18.4% of those who describe experiencing gaming-induced fury also disclosed they’ve broken something out of anger, with 73.2% revealing they’ve destroyed a controller or keyboard/mouse. Drywall, TVs, phones, and dishes were also common victims,” Treanor wrote.

(Data courtesy Time2play.com)