Man’s death from teaspoon of caffeine powder in protein shake prompts warning

World

A young Australian man died after he added just a single teaspoon of caffeine powder to a protein shake he drank.

It happened one day before his 22nd birthday.

21-year-old Lachlan Foote reportedly blacked out and did not regain consciousness, according to News 7 Australia.

Local reports say a coroner determined Foote died of caffeine toxicity after unknowingly consuming a dangerous amount of the caffeine powder.

The FDA has said that people may not realize the powdered form is a pure chemical, and that the difference between a safe amount and a lethal dose is very small.

A teaspoon of the powder is reportedly the equivalent of 25 to 50 cups of coffee.

The powder is often marketed as a dietary supplement and is unregulated, unlike caffeine added to soda.

It is popular among some teens and young adults for its perceived energy boost.

An Ohio teen and a Georgia man died back in 2015 after consuming caffeine powder.

Newsweek reports that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued a warning in 2018 explaining that “pure and highly concentrated caffeine products present a significant public health threat and have contributed to at least two deaths in the United States.”

These types of products are known to cause symptoms including seizures, dangerous rapid heartbeats, and death in some cases, according to the FDA.

Vomiting, diarrhea, and disorientation are also known symptoms.

Foote’s family is calling for a ban on caffeine powder in Australia.

According to WebMD, around 100,000 milligrams of caffeine powder can be bought online for $10 – that’s the equivalent of 1,000 cans of Red Bull.

Health officials say a person should not consume more than 600 mg of caffeine daily.

By comparison, a grande Starbucks coffee (16-ounces) equals 330 mg of caffeine.

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