California Propositions

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SAN FRANCISCO, Calif. (KRON) – Californians have 12 statewide ballot propositions to vote on this year.

Here is a breakdown of each ballot measure:

Proposition 14

This prop would approve $5.5 billion state bonds for stem cells and other medical research in training, research facility construction, and administrative costs. $1.5 billion would be dedicated to brain-related diseases. Over the next 30 years, about $260 million per year will be paid back to taxpayers through the funds acquired by general obligation bonds.

YES VOTENO VOTE
The state could sell $5.5 billion in general obligation bonds primarily for stem cell research and the development of new medical treatments in California.The state could not sell $5.5 billion in general obligation bonds primarily for stem cell research and the development of new medical treatments in California.

Proposition 15

This prop would change how commercial properties are taxed based on current market value, rather than the purchase price. This would provide between $6.5 billion to $11.5 billion in new funding to local governments and schools.

YES VOTENO VOTE
Property taxes on most commercial properties worth more than $3 million would go up in order to provide new funding to local governments and schools.Property taxes on commercial properties would stay the same. Local governments and schools would not get new funding.

Proposition 16

This prop would change the state law to allow government decision-making policies, such as public employment, education, and contracting, to consider race, sex, color, ethnicity, or national origin. This then allows governments and public universities to grant preferences based on these factors.

YES VOTENO VOTE
State and local entities could consider race, sex, color, ethnicity, and national origin in public education, public employment, and public contracting to the extent allowed under federal and state law.The current ban on the consideration of race, sex, color, ethnicity, and national origin in public education, public employment, and public con

Proposition 17

This prop would allow a person convicted of a felony and served in prison the right to voting while they are on parole. According to lawmakers, this would cost taxpayers hundreds of thousands of dollars to get voter registration cards and systems.

YES VOTENO VOTE
People on state parole who are U.S. citizens, residents of California, and at least 18 years of age would be able to vote, if they register to vote.People on state parole would continue to be unable to vote in California.

Proposition 18

This prop would authorize 17-year-olds who will turn 18 by the general election, the right to vote in the primary or special elections. Every two years, this would cost taxpayers up to a million dollars.

YES VOTENO VOTE
Eligible 17-year-olds who will be 18 years old by the time of the next general election may vote in the primary election and any special elections preceding the general election.No one younger than 18 years of age may vote in any election.

Proposition 19

This prop would let homeowners 55 or older, disabled, or who is a wildfire or disaster victim to transfer property tax base to a replacement home. Local governments could gain tens of millions in revenue per year.

YES VOTENO VOTE
All homeowners who are over 55 (or who meet other qualifications) would be eligible for property tax savings when they move. Only inherited properties used as primary homes or farms would be eligible for property tax savings.Some homeowners who are over 55 (or who meet other qualifications) would continue to be eligible for property tax savings when they move. All inherited properties would continue to be eligible for property tax savings.

Proposition 20

Proposition 20 offers a range of policies meant to make California laws tougher on crime. If passed, two of the main things this prop would change in the state constitution are increasing penalties for theft and making it harder for people to get out of prison on supervised release.

Lawmakers say taxpayers would collectively pay millions each year for increased correctional, court, and law enforcement costs.

YES VOTENO VOTE
People who commit certain theft-related crimes (such as repeat shoplifting) could receive increased penalties (such as longer jail terms). Additional factors would be considered for the state’s process for releasing certain inmates from prison early. Law enforcement would be required to collect DNA samples from adults convicted of certain misdemeanors.Penalties for people who commit certain theft-related crimes would not be increased. There would be no change to the state’s process for releasing certain inmates from prison early. Law enforcement would continue to be required to collect DNA samples from adults only if they are arrested for a felony or required to register as sex offenders or arsonists.

Proposition 21

This prop would allow local governments to control the amount that landlords charge for residences for over 15 years old. Lawmakers say this could cost the government up to tens of millions of dollars per year over time.

YES VOTENO VOTE
State law would allow cities and counties to apply more kinds of rent control to more properties than under current law.State law would maintain current limits on rent control laws cities and counties can apply.

Proposition 22

This prop would allow app-based drivers, like Uber and Lyft services, to be classified as independent contractors. This would also create new labor and wage policies for workers.

YES VOTENO VOTE
App-based rideshare and delivery companies could hire drivers as independent contractors. Drivers could decide when, where, and how much to work but would not get standard benefits and protections that businesses must provide employees.App-based rideshare and delivery companies would have to hire drivers as employees if the courts say that a recent state law makes drivers employees. Drivers would have less choice about when, where, and how much to work but would get standard benefits and protections that businesses must provide employees.

Proposition 23

This prop would require doctors to be present during dialysis treatment. It would also require clinics to treat patients no matter their payment source. Lawmakers say this would increase government costs annually by tens of millions of dollars.

YES VOTENO VOTE
Chronic dialysis clinics would be required to have a doctor on-site during all patient treatment hours.Chronic dialysis clinics would not be required to have a doctor on-site during all patient treatment hours.

Proposition 24

This prop would expand the states data privacy laws by preventing businesses from sharing personal information, correct inaccurate personal information, and limit businesses’ use of ‘sensitive personal information.’ This would create the California Privacy Protection Agency. It will cost taxpayers at least $10 million.

YES VOTENO VOTE
Existing consumer data privacy laws and rights would be expanded. Businesses required to meet privacy requirements would change. A new state agency and the state’s Department of Justice would share responsibility for overseeing and enforcing state consumer privacy laws.Businesses would continue to be required to follow existing consumer data privacy laws. Consumers would continue to have existing data privacy rights. The state’s Department of Justice would continue to oversee and enforce these laws.

Proposition 25

This prop would approve a law to replace money bail with system based on public safety and flight risk. Those considered low risk are released from jail, medium risk to either be released or detained depending on local rules, and high risk would remain in jail to await trial.

YES VOTENO VOTE
No one would pay bail to be released from jail before trial. Instead, people would either be released automatically or based on their assessed risk of committing another crime or not appearing in court if released. No one would be charged fees as a condition of release.Some people would continue to pay bail to be released from jail before trial. Other people could continue to be released without paying bail. Fees may continue to be charged as a condition of release.


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